CISPA Passes in Closed Door Vote

“As US cybersecurity bill CISPA heads to the House Floor for a vote, the White House National Security Council has issued a statement suggesting that the President won’t support it in its current form. “We continue to believe that information sharing improvements are essential to effective legislation,” said NSC spokesperson Caitlin Hayden told the Los Angeles Times in a statement. “but they must include privacy and civil liberties protections, reinforce the roles of civilian and intelligence agencies, and include targeted liability protections.”*

CISPA, the controversial bill that greatly threatens the privacy of anyone online, is making its way to Congress after passing in a closed-door vote by the House Intelligence Committee by a huge margin. There were no changes to the language to protect personal privacy. How is this happening after the internet so loudly cried foul, and why is it being ignored in the press? Cenk Uygur and Ana Kasparian break it down.

Thanks TheYoungTurks for the video

The coming war on general computation

The coming war on general computation. The copyright war was just the beginning.

warning: non violent IT jargon

The last 20 years of Internet policy have been dominated by the copyright war, but the war turns out only to have been a skirmish. The coming century will be dominated by war against the general purpose computer, and the stakes are the freedom, fortune and privacy of the entire human race.

Thanks CCCen for the video

Internet Mafia Exposed

Exploring the outrageous new powers being given to a new Internet regulatory entity, negotiated in secret by 39 countries, ACTA is one more offensive against the sharing of culture on the Internet. Officially The Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) is a proposed plurilateral agreement for the purpose of establishing international standards on intellectual property rights enforcement. ACTA would establish a new international legal framework that countries can join on a voluntary basis and would create its own governing body outside existing international institutions. Negotiating countries have described it as a response “to the increase in global trade of counterfeit goods and pirated copyright protected works. The scope of ACTA includes counterfeit goods, generic medicines and copyright infringement on the Internet.”

A signing ceremony was held on 1 October 2011 in Tokyo, with the United States, Australia, Canada, Japan, Morocco, New Zealand, Singapore, and South Korea signing the treaty. The European Union, Mexico, and Switzerland did not sign the treaty, but “attended the ceremony and confirmed their continuing strong support for and preparations to sign the Agreement as soon as practicable.” Article 39 of ACTA specifies that the agreement is open for signature until 31 March 2013.

Thank you HorseofPaulRevere for the video.